NOAF Contemporary Home Tour: New Residential Design in New Orleans

NOAF Contemporary Home Tour: New Residential Design in New Orleans

Two nineteenth-century Uptown New Orleans neighborhoods with complex histories provide the locus for the NOAF 2019 Contemporary Home Tour. The venerable Lower Garden District was a fashionable place to settle in the early nineteenth century, boasting a unique layout that included Coliseum Square as a focal point. Meanwhile, across Magazine Street the Irish Channel developed as a working class neighborhood closely connected with the port activity along the Mississippi River. Following a period of decline in the late twentieth century, today both neighborhoods are thriving; the recent renovation of the Coliseum Square fountain is a noteworthy indication of neighborhood pride, and renovations and new houses are occurring on almost every block in the Irish Channel.

Among the new houses being built in these neighborhoods, the majority are reflective of nineteenth century New Orleans building types, particularly the townhouse and the camelback. There are also a number of contemporary designs; and these are the focus of our attention.

Contemporary design meets historic detail in a stunning Audubon Street home

Contemporary design meets historic detail in a stunning Audubon Street home

The two-story Neoclassical Revival-style residence at 479 Audubon Street was constructed c.1902 for Emile Dreuil, a prominent cotton exporter and native of St. Lucia in the British West Indies. When the current owners purchased the home in 2016 and decided to renovate, they selected architect Megan Bell of Bell Butler Design and Architecture to oversee the project. This article was written by Beth A. Jacob, AIA, Senior Associate of the MacRostie Historic Advisors New Orleans office.

Home Tour Feature - 452 Audubon Street

Home Tour Feature - 452 Audubon Street

NOAF’s friend and partner, Katrina Horning, of New Orleans Architecture Tours, shares the history behind the Colonial Revival home of Caroline and Murray Calhoun. Completed in 1918 by architect Frank G. Churchill, this home was clearly free from the earlier constraints of symmetry and designed to reflect the ideals of past architecture but add a new twist. After all, it is Colonial Revival, not Colonial Copies.