HQ: Modern Market, 1200 Annunciation St

1. 1113/1115 St Mary St: Andra Aitken and Ramiro Diaz

2. 500 Jackson Ave: Dixon Stetler

3. 2322 St Thomas St: Robert Bandzuch

4. 608 Fourth St: Kyle and Mary Gilmore

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More information below on some of the stops and shops along the way!

Photo: Colectivo Design

Photo: Colectivo Design

A. French Truck Coffee | 1200 Magazine St

Formerly a repair shop for ships’ emergency life rafts

Now a local and regional institution, French Truck opened its first shop at this location in 2014. Designed by New Orleans’ Colectivo, French Truck’s locations combine a clean contemporary aesthetic with tactile materials like wood and ceramics to create bright and inviting spaces known as much for their atmosphere as for their excellent coffee.

Photo: New Orleans Tourism Marketing Corporation

Photo: New Orleans Tourism Marketing Corporation

B. Lily’s Cafe | 1813 Magazine St

Excellent pho, banh mi, bun, spring rolls and much more

A classic neighborhood Vietnamese restaurant, with food options both inexpensive and plentiful, Lily’s also offers a number of vegan and vegetarian options. It is one of several South and East Asian eateries on the Lower Garden stretch of Magazine Street, along with Little Korea BBQ (2240 Magazine), Pho Noi Viet (2005 Magazine) and Union Ramen, coming soon to 1837 Magazine.

Photo: Fine Art America

Photo: Fine Art America

C. St. Alphonsus Art and Cultural Center | 2045 Constance St

Former Irish Catholic church, now an arts venue

Constructed in the mid-1850s and consecrated in 1857 by the Redemptorist Fathers, and named for their founder St. Alphonsus Ligouri, this was one of three Catholic churches which each served specific national and language communities. St. Alphonsus served the English-speaking Irish immigrants, while St. Mary’s Assumption across the street served Germans and Notre Dame des Bons Secours ministered to the French. As each group assimilated and the Catholic population declined from its late 19th-century height, the parish consolidated its churches, such that today Mass is celebrated in the former German church while St. Alphonsus serves as a space for arts and cultural programming which preserves the unique and varied cultural heritages of the neighborhood.

Photo: District Donuts

Photo: District Donuts

D. District Donuts Sliders Brew | 2209 Magazine St

Gourmet pastries, coffees and beers

Opened in 2013, this was the first of District Donuts’ shops, which feature impeccably crafted cream, chocolate and fruit-filled donuts, slider hamburgers and other sandwiches, and beers on tap in convivially designed spaces outfitted with the work of custom millwork shop Good Wood NOLA. Though born in the Garden District, you can now find them Uptown, in Lakeview, in Baton Rouge and soon in Las Vegas, Nevada.

Photo: Southern Jewish Life Magazine

Photo: Southern Jewish Life Magazine

E. Former Gates of Prayer Synagogue | 709 Jackson Ave

Completed in 1865, now luxury condos

For most of the 19th century, this neighborhood was the independent city of Lafayette, Jefferson Parish (the parish line, now much farther Uptown, was moved several times in the course of that century). The abundant jobs in shipping, manufacturing and other industries made Lafayette an attractive place for recently arrived European immigrants to settle, including the German Jews from the provinces of Alsace and Lorraine who began construction on Shaarei Tefiloh (Gates of Prayer) Synagogue in 1859. The congregation joined the liberalizing Reform movement in 1908, and followed the migrating Reform Jewish population Uptown to Napoleon and Coliseum in 1920, then to West Esplanade Avenue in Metairie in 1970. After a long vacancy, its original home was redeveloped into nine luxury residences in 2015.

Photo: FDR Presidential Library

Photo: FDR Presidential Library

F. Former St. Thomas Public Housing | 1801 St Thomas St

Surviving remnant privately managed

Constructed beginning in 1938 under the first wave of federally funded public housing projects developed as a part of President Franklin Roosevelt’s New Deal, the St. Thomas contained 1,510 apartments in solidly built brick two and three-story buildings, the last three of which survive at this location. Originally for White families only, the St. Thomas became home to thousands of Black families after the desegregation of public housing in 1949 and subsequent flight of its White population, enabled by VA home loans and other forms of federal mortgage assistance denied to Black Americans, to newly developed suburbs. Initially, the projects represented an improvement in housing quality for many working-class Black New Orleanians.

But disinvestment and continued discrimination led to dangerous circumstances for residents, but the demolition of the St. Thomas and its replacement by the privately managed River Garden development in the and a Walmart in the early 2000s led to the permanent displacement of thousands from the neighborhood despite explicit promises that they would be able to return - presaging the post-Katrina demolition of thousands more public housing units and displacement of tens of thousands of Black New Orleanians as a result of intentional development and policy decisions.

Photo: Urban South Brewery

Photo: Urban South Brewery

G. Urban South Brewery | 1645 Tchoupitoulas St

Former warehouse, now roomy beer hall

Since 2016, Urban South has grown rapidly to become a leader in the New Orleans craft beer scene, where its European-style beers infused with American flavors have grown popular. The brewery’s location, in a spacious mid-20th century brick warehouse not far from the iconic former Market Street power plant’s twin smokestacks, helps set it apart from its many competitors. Urban South has recently announced an expansion to Houston.

Photo: Urban Roots

Photo: Urban Roots

H. Urban Roots Garden Center | 2375 Tchoupitoulas St

Wide selection of plants, pots, garden tools. Free smells

New Orleans’ home gardeners - a large and ever-growing population, emboldened by the Mississippi River Delta’s fertile soil and South Louisiana’s tropical climate - swear by Urban Roots as a favorite for seeds, soils, pots and plants of all kinds. The garden center’s vibrant and fragrant outdoor aisles stand in welcome contrast to the monotonous Tchoupitoulas Street floodwall.

Photo: blackenedout.blogspot.com

Photo: blackenedout.blogspot.com

I. Parasol’s | 2533 Constance St

Intimate corner bar known for poboys

Somewhere between a friendly neighborhood corner joint and a dive bar, Parasol’s provides inexpensive drinks in a friendly atmosphere which - unlike the rest of the neighborhood - has not changed all that much since 1952. During the day, quality poboys are served through a small window in the bar’s back room, where some of the city’s least pretentious and most delicious meals can be found.

Photo: Uptown Messenger

Photo: Uptown Messenger

J. Tracey’s | 2604 Magazine St

Expansive sports bar and restaurant also known for poboys

Down the block from Parasol’s, Tracey’s also serves poboys from a window in the back, but in a more conventional sports bar-restaurant atmosphere, and in addition to wings, burgers and more. Numerous TVs and extensive outdoor seating provide a raucous atmosphere, particularly during college and professional sports events.

How can I get to the Home Tour? How do I get between the homes?

We recommend biking, riding the bus or streetcar, rideshares, and walking.
Private cars are also an option, but parking may be limited and difficult to find.

Download the RTA’s GoMobile app for real-time transit schedules and location information.